- Betamethasone dipropionate in propylene glycol based

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USA - Betamethasone dipropionate cream - Google Patents



 

Effective date : Year of fee payment : 4. Year of fee payment : 8. Year of fee payment : Disclosed is an elegant cream-like formulation of betamethasone dipropionate useful as a topical antiinflammatory product. This invention relates to an elegant cream-like formulation of betamethasone dipropionate. A betamethasone dipropionate cream has been sold by Schering Corporation under the trademark Diprosone.

That product consists of betamethasone dipropionate in a cream consisting of purified water, mineral oil, white petrolatum, polyethylene glycol monocetyl ether, cetostearyl alcohol, monobasic sodium phosphate and phosphoric acid, with 4-chloro-m-cresol and propylene glycol as preservatives. The formulation of the present invention is remarkably simple compared to Diprosone cream.

It contains a glycol solvent as a major component, but it is free of any other preservative and contains no surfactants. It is thus less likely to cause allergic reactions due to these additives.

Nevertheless, the formulation of the present invention is hightly efficacous and is stable. In fact, it is surprisingly more effective than Diprosone cream. Also, even though standard preservatives are not present, the present formulation has been found to be self preserving when tested in standardized assays for the determination of growth of Eschericia coli, Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillis niger, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

In standard dermal irriration studies on rabbits, the formulation of the present invention has been found to be less irritating than Diprosone cream. The formulation of this invention is of value in the topical treatment of dermatological disorders that are responsive to corticosteroids.

Included within this category are disorders such as psoriasis, contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis and eczema. Treatment with the formulation of this invention is usually accomplished by applying the cream-like gel to completely cover the affected area.

The usual frequency of application is twice daily, although adequate maintenance therapy for some patients may be achieved with less frequent application. The formulation of the present invention consists essentially of about 0. In a preferred aspect of the present invention, 0.

The preferred based is sodium hydroxide. Carbomer is an acrylic acid polymer having an approximate molecular weight of 4, It is available from B. Goodrich Chemical Company of as Corbopol resin. This formulation results in an elegant cream-like gel. The use of this formulation is particularly advantageous as the formulation has the desired appearance of a cream but is more easily applied than a gel while it is surprisingly more effective than the Diprosone cream known in the art.

The cream-like gel of the present invention is manufactured in a conventional manner by thoroughly mixing the ingredients at ambient or elevated temperatures. Preferably, the betamethasone dipropionate, dissolved in a portion of propylene glycol, is added to the cream-like gel. The ingredients are thoroughly mixed so that the product is homogenous. If desired, additional mechanical agitation can be used as an intermediate or final step in the manufacturing process to impart more homogeneity or improve texture.

Processing equipment suitable for these steps is known and includes heat exchangers, propeller mixers, colloid mills, homogenizers, roller mills and the like. The following formulation examples illustrate the compositions of the present invention.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that many modifications thereof may be practiced without departing from the purpose and intent of this disclosure.

We claim: 1. A topical pharmaceutical composition for the treatment of inflammation consisting essentially of 0. A pharmaceutical composition according to claim 1 consisting essentially of 0. A pharmaceutical composition according to claim 1 wherein said base is sodium hydroxide. USA en. NZA en. ZAB en. Topically active anti-inflammatory mono- and 17,diesters of betamethasone and its 9-chloro-analogs, compositions and use thereof. Topically administrable pharmaceutical compositions containing anti-inflammatory steroids.

Pharmaceutical and veterinary compositions of mupirocin and methods for their preparation. DEA1 en. CHA5 en. DDA5 en. DEC2 en. AUB2 en. DEB2 en. EPB1 en. USA1 en. DEB4 en. GBA en. EPA1 en.

    ❾-50%}

 

Diprolene Glycol - Pharmasave - Pharmasave.Diprolene Glycol - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - localhost



    As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Thinning of skin: Using topical corticosteroid medications for a long period of time can cause skin and the tissues underneath to thin or soften, or cause stretch marks. Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Goodrich Chemical Company of as Corbopol resin. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

A topical pharmaceutical composition for the treatment of inflammation consisting essentially of 0. A pharmaceutical composition according to claim 1 consisting essentially of 0. A pharmaceutical composition according to claim 1 wherein said base is sodium hydroxide. USA en. NZA en. ZAB en.

Topically active anti-inflammatory mono- and 17,diesters of betamethasone and its 9-chloro-analogs, compositions and use thereof. Topically administrable pharmaceutical compositions containing anti-inflammatory steroids. Pharmaceutical and veterinary compositions of mupirocin and methods for their preparation.

DEA1 en. CHA5 en. DDA5 en. DEC2 en. AUB2 en. DEB2 en. EPB1 en. USA1 en. DEB4 en. Infection: Betamethasone should not be used on any infected area until the infection has cleared. Topical corticosteroids may increase the risk of developing a skin infection. If you notice any increased redness, swelling, heat, or pain around the area where the medication is applied, contact your doctor, as these are possible signs of infection. Stopping this medication: Suddenly stopping corticosteroid medication may cause your skin condition to return.

If you have been using this medication or others that are similar for a long period of time, discuss with your doctor the best way to discontinue the medication. Thinning of skin: Using topical corticosteroid medications for a long period of time can cause skin and the tissues underneath to thin or soften, or cause stretch marks. Your doctor may recommend you stop using this medication once in a while or to apply to one area of the body at a time to give the skin a chance to strengthen.

If you notice changes to the texture or colour of your skin, contact your doctor as soon as possible, as this may be a sign that the medication needs to be reduced. Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks.

If you become pregnant while using this medication, contact your doctor immediately. Breast feeding: It is not known if topical betamethasone dipropionate passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are using this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: Betamethasone dipropionate belongs to the family of medications known as corticosteroids. Children may be more likely to experience the side effects encountered by using large amounts of this class medication for long periods of time e.

The use of this medication by children should be limited to the smallest amount that will be effective for the shortest period of time. Discuss the risks and benefits of the use of this medication by children with your doctor.

There may be an interaction between betamethasone dipropionate and any of the following:. If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:. An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter non-prescription , and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Source: www. About this Medication. If you miss a dose, apply it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice. Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater e. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Ointment Each gram of ointment contains 0. Nonmedicinal ingredients: propylene glycol monostearate, propylene glycol, white wax, and white soft paraffin. Many medications can cause side effects.

A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication.

If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

Although most of these side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention. Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:.

Additional side effects may occur if this medication is used improperly or for long periods of time. Some people may experience side effects other than those listed.

Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication. Be sure to tell all health professionals involved in your care that you are using this medication.

Absorption: Topical applied to the skin corticosteroids such as betamethasone dipropionate are known to be absorbed into the bloodstream if used for prolonged periods of time on large areas of the body. This occurs most often when the medication is covered with a bandage that doesn't breathe or if you have skin problems with impaired circulation. This increases the risk of side effects from this medication throughout the body.

It is advisable to use this medication only for brief periods and to stop using it as soon as the problem clears. Eyes: Use this medication with caution on lesions close to the eye. Take care to ensure that it does not enter the eye, as glaucoma may result. Cataracts have been reported following internal use of corticosteroids.

Report changes in your vision to your doctor as soon as possible. Infection: Betamethasone should not be used on any infected area until the infection has cleared. Topical corticosteroids may increase the risk of developing a skin infection. If you notice any increased redness, swelling, heat, or pain around the area where the medication is applied, contact your doctor, as these are possible signs of infection.

Betamethasone dipropionate belongs to the class of medications called topical corticosteroids. It is used to relieve inflammatory symptoms and itch caused by severe psoriasis and rashes that respond to treatment with corticosteroid creams, lotions, or ointments.

Such rashes include contact dermatitis, eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, and senile pruritis. It works by reducing inflammation, swelling, and irritation of the skin.

Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles.

If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do.

It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. Cream or ointment: Apply enough cream or ointment to completely cover the affected area, with a thin film. Massage it gently and thoroughly into the skin. This medication is usually applied once daily in the morning, or twice daily in the morning and at night as directed by the doctor. The treatment should be stopped when the condition is cleared. Do not continue the medication for longer than 4 weeks without further consulting your doctor.

Lotion: A few drops of lotion is usually enough to cover the affected area. Gently massage the lotion into the area until it disappears. The lotion is usually applied once or twice daily. The cream, ointment, and lotion should not be covered with a dressing that does not allow the area to breathe, such as plastic wrap or a diaper. Doing so may cause unwanted effects of the medication.

Do not let this medication get in your eyes. If contact occurs, flush with plenty of water and consult your doctor.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are using the medication without consulting your doctor. It is important that this medication be used exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, apply it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule.

If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children. Do not dispose of medications in wastewater e. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired. Ointment Each gram of ointment contains 0. Nonmedicinal ingredients: propylene glycol monostearate, propylene glycol, white wax, and white soft paraffin.

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. Although most of these side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:. Additional side effects may occur if this medication is used improperly or for long periods of time. Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health.

These factors may affect how you should use this medication. Be sure to tell all health professionals involved in your care that you are using this medication. Absorption: Topical applied to the skin corticosteroids such as betamethasone dipropionate are known to be absorbed into the bloodstream if used for prolonged periods of time on large areas of the body. This occurs most often when the medication is covered with a bandage that doesn't breathe or if you have skin problems with impaired circulation.

This increases the risk of side effects from this medication throughout the body. It is advisable to use this medication only for brief periods and to stop using it as soon as the problem clears. Eyes: Use this medication with caution on lesions close to the eye.

Take care to ensure that it does not enter the eye, as glaucoma may result. Cataracts have been reported following internal use of corticosteroids. Report changes in your vision to your doctor as soon as possible. Infection: Betamethasone should not be used on any infected area until the infection has cleared.

Topical corticosteroids may increase the risk of developing a skin infection. If you notice any increased redness, swelling, heat, or pain around the area where the medication is applied, contact your doctor, as these are possible signs of infection.

Stopping this medication: Suddenly stopping corticosteroid medication may cause your skin condition to return. If you have been using this medication or others that are similar for a long period of time, discuss with your doctor the best way to discontinue the medication. Thinning of skin: Using topical corticosteroid medications for a long period of time can cause skin and the tissues underneath to thin or soften, or cause stretch marks.

Your doctor may recommend you stop using this medication once in a while or to apply to one area of the body at a time to give the skin a chance to strengthen.

If you notice changes to the texture or colour of your skin, contact your doctor as soon as possible, as this may be a sign that the medication needs to be reduced. Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while using this medication, contact your doctor immediately. Breast feeding: It is not known if topical betamethasone dipropionate passes into breast milk.

If you are a breast-feeding mother and are using this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: Betamethasone dipropionate belongs to the family of medications known as corticosteroids. Children may be more likely to experience the side effects encountered by using large amounts of this class medication for long periods of time e.

The use of this medication by children should be limited to the smallest amount that will be effective for the shortest period of time. Discuss the risks and benefits of the use of this medication by children with your doctor. There may be an interaction between betamethasone dipropionate and any of the following:. If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed. Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter non-prescriptionand herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take.

Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Source: www. Pharmasave uses cookies to provide a personalized experience, analyze traffic, improve site performance, and provide social media features. By using our site, you agree to our privacy policy.

Search Search. Diprolene Glycol. How does this medication work? What will it do for me? How should I use this medication? Shake the lotion well before applying it to the affected area. What form s does this medication come in?

Abstract. Betamethasone dipropionate, %, in a propylene glycol ointment vehicle (Diprolene Ointment) was administered to forty-seven patients with resistant. Diprolene Glycol: Betamethasone dipropionate belongs to the class of medications called topical corticosteroids. It is used to relieve inflammatory symptoms. Betamethasone dipropionate belongs to the class of medications called topical Nonmedicinal ingredients: propylene glycol monostearate, propylene glycol. propylene glycol components of the vehicle increase penetration and betamethasone dipropionate cream or ointment on groups of normal. Each gram of DIPROLENE Ointment % contains mg betamethasone dipropionate, USP. (equivalent to mg betamethasone), in a vehicle of propylene glycol. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. DEB4 en. It works by reducing inflammation, swelling, and irritation of the skin. The treatment should be stopped when the condition is cleared. It is used to relieve inflammatory symptoms and itch caused by severe psoriasis and rashes that respond to treatment with corticosteroid creams, lotions, or ointments.

Betamethasone dipropionate belongs to the class of medications called topical corticosteroids. It is used to relieve inflammatory symptoms and itch caused by severe psoriasis and rashes that respond to treatment with corticosteroid creams, lotions, or ointments. Such rashes include contact dermatitis, eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, and senile pruritis.

It works by reducing inflammation, swelling, and irritation of the skin. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here.

As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles.

If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. Ointment Each gram of ointment contains 0. Nonmedicinal ingredients: propylene glycol monostearate, propylene glycol, white wax, and white soft paraffin.

Cream or ointment: Apply enough cream or ointment to completely cover the affected area, with a thin film. Massage it gently and thoroughly into the skin. This medication is usually applied once daily in the morning, or twice daily in the morning and at night as directed by the doctor. The treatment should be stopped when the condition is cleared. Do not continue the medication for longer than 4 weeks without further consulting your doctor.

Lotion: A few drops of lotion is usually enough to cover the affected area. Gently massage the lotion into the area until it disappears. The lotion is usually applied once or twice daily. The cream, ointment, and lotion should not be covered with a dressing that does not allow the area to breathe, such as plastic wrap or a diaper. Doing so may cause unwanted effects of the medication. Do not let this medication get in your eyes. If contact occurs, flush with plenty of water and consult your doctor.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are using the medication without consulting your doctor. It is important that this medication be used exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, apply it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule.

If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children. Do not dispose of medications in wastewater e.

Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired. Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication.

If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. Although most of these side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:. Additional side effects may occur if this medication is used improperly or for long periods of time.

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Be sure to tell all health professionals involved in your care that you are using this medication. Absorption: Topical applied to the skin corticosteroids such as betamethasone dipropionate are known to be absorbed into the bloodstream if used for prolonged periods of time on large areas of the body.

This occurs most often when the medication is covered with a bandage that doesn't breathe or if you have skin problems with impaired circulation. This increases the risk of side effects from this medication throughout the body. It is advisable to use this medication only for brief periods and to stop using it as soon as the problem clears.

Eyes: Use this medication with caution on lesions close to the eye. Take care to ensure that it does not enter the eye, as glaucoma may result. Cataracts have been reported following internal use of corticosteroids.

Report changes in your vision to your doctor as soon as possible. Infection: Betamethasone should not be used on any infected area until the infection has cleared. Topical corticosteroids may increase the risk of developing a skin infection. If you notice any increased redness, swelling, heat, or pain around the area where the medication is applied, contact your doctor, as these are possible signs of infection.

Stopping this medication: Suddenly stopping corticosteroid medication may cause your skin condition to return. If you have been using this medication or others that are similar for a long period of time, discuss with your doctor the best way to discontinue the medication. Thinning of skin: Using topical corticosteroid medications for a long period of time can cause skin and the tissues underneath to thin or soften, or cause stretch marks.

Your doctor may recommend you stop using this medication once in a while or to apply to one area of the body at a time to give the skin a chance to strengthen. If you notice changes to the texture or colour of your skin, contact your doctor as soon as possible, as this may be a sign that the medication needs to be reduced.

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while using this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast feeding: It is not known if topical betamethasone dipropionate passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are using this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding. Children: Betamethasone dipropionate belongs to the family of medications known as corticosteroids. Children may be more likely to experience the side effects encountered by using large amounts of this class medication for long periods of time e.

The use of this medication by children should be limited to the smallest amount that will be effective for the shortest period of time. Discuss the risks and benefits of the use of this medication by children with your doctor. There may be an interaction between betamethasone dipropionate and any of the following:. If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed. Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication.

Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter non-prescription , and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them. All material copyright MediResource Inc. Terms and conditions of use.

The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www. About this Medication. How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Acne Doctor Discussion Guide. Acne: Fact vs Myth Quiz. Acne Treatment Options Table. Toenail Fungus: Treatment Options Table. Toenail Fungus: Fact vs Myth Module.



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